Looking Through The Achives

I think I’ve finally turned the corner on this darn cold, so I might get out shooting again, this coming week. However, for the past few days, I have been looking through the archives. One of the things that struck me was the fact that, in a relatively short period of time, I have been shooting with five different cameras: Nikon D70s, D7000, and D700, and Olympus E-PL1 and Olympus OMD-EM5.

These next two images were made with my daughter’s Nikon D7000. While visiting Elizabeth, in Denver, a couple of years ago, her D7000 fell. Notice that I did not say that I dropped it. However, since I was closest to it, and may, in fact, have been taking it off a tripod, circumstantial evidence seems to point to me as being at fault. Regardless, the caring father that I am, I lent her my D700 while I sent her camera to Nikon for repair. Rather than send it back to her, immediately, I knew that I would see her in a couple of months, when she was to shoot my son, Jorge’s wedding. In the mean time, I took her D7000 out on the streets of Los Angeles.

These three images are the part of the result.

Rick Smith

Rick Smith

Above, we have the debonair Rick Smith. The D7000 has a x1.5 crop factor, so the lens, a Nikon 24-120 has an effective focal length of 48-240. In this case, I was at the full 120 (240). ISO 400, 1/250, f5.6. I love this lens, but a lot of people don’t, because it is relatively slow, with a variable aperture of f3.5-5.6. Until I started shoot with an Olympus micro four thirds system, this 24-120 was my ‘street sweeper’ lens. Essentially, I would set the camera to aperture priority, and the f-stop to f5.6. That aperture gave me the depth of field for most of my shots, yet overcame the varying aperture of the lens.

In the image below, we have the cleverly titled Man-nequines. Most people will be drawn to the fact that there is one human, in nearly the same pose and wardrobe as the surrounding mannequins. Discerning aficionados of street photography will, however, recognize the image of renowned street walker, Mark Rosales, at the extreme right of the frame. For this image, I dropped the ISO to 100 and opened up to f3.5 with the lens racked back to 24mm (effectively 48mm).

Man-nequins

Man-nequins

The final image, also with the D7000 and 24-120mm lens at ISO 100, f3.5 is mark Rosales, in ninja mode, capturing a street vendor.

Mark Rosales

Ninja Mark

Off the streets and with some color, I want to show an image that I made of Beth, in the Huntington Beach Central Park. Using a Nikon D700 at ISO 200, f2.8, 1/500 and 200mm, on a 70-200mm Nikon lens, she was both beautiful and bright (in her last year at Berkley, at the time).

Beth in the Park

Beth in the Park

Back to Los Angeles, sharing a table at a Starbucks with this gentleman, and Chris Holt, I brought out the Olympus OMD-EM5 with a 9mm Body Cap Lens at ISO 1600 and 1/13.

Writing in the Coffee Shop

Writing in the Coffee Shop

Chris Holt

Chris Holt

Still in LA, and back to the D700, with a Nikon 24mm prime at f5.6, this is the Disney Concert Hall.

Disney Concert Hall

Disney Concert Hall

I liked this gentleman. We didn’t speak, but when we made eye contact, he gave the nicest smile. He was aware that I wanted to take his picture, so I had to wait awhile until he stopped smiling and became more natural. You are probably getting tired of the technical data, so I just say that this was with the EM5, 17mm, f2.8. Okay, I’ll just post a few more images, without narrative. I talk too much. 🙂 Except for the last two images (D700) the rest of these photos were made with the OMD-EM5.

Waiting for a Beer

Waiting for a Beer

Need Jumper Cables

Need Jumper Cables

Lunch with a Friend

Lunch with a Friend

Waiting for a Train

Waiting for a Train

Also Waiting for a Train

Also Waiting for a Train

And Another Waiting at Union Station

And Another Waiting at Union Station

War Horse

War Horse

ALL IMAGES COPYRIGHT: PAUL EDWARD ROBISON No use without written permission.

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